brain development

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Growing Up In Disadvantaged Areas May Affect Teens’ Brains, But Good Parenting Can Help

New research has found growing up in a disadvantaged neighbourhood may have negative effects on children’s brain development. But for males, at least, positive parenting negated these negative effects, providing some good lessons for parents. Living in a disadvantaged neighbourhood (where there are more people who have low income jobs or are unemployed, are less [...]

Why Our Brain Thrives On Mistakes

A Growing Brain vs. a Static Brain A body of research that began in 2011 suggests that this aversion to mistakes can be a cause of poor learning habits. The research suggested that those of us who have a “growth mindset”—believing that intelligence is malleable—pay more attention to mistakes and treat them as a wake-up [...]

The Effect That Childhood Trauma Has On Mental Health

We know events like childhood trauma cause physiological changes in one’s body. These changes in turn correlate with behavioral changes that manifest themselves as symptoms, and what psychiatry and its DSM-5 do is assign labels to certain clusters and combinations of these symptomatic manifestations, with each label representing and naming an individual and distinct mental [...]

Teachers Must Ditch ‘Neuromyth’ Of Learning Styles

Teaching children according to their individual “learning style” does not achieve better results and should be ditched by schools in favour of evidence-based practice, according to leading scientists. Thirty eminent academics from the worlds of neuroscience, education and psychology have signed a letter to the Guardian voicing their concern about the popularity of the learning [...]

Teenagers Do Dumb Things, But There Are Ways To Limit Recklessness

By now parents are familiar with the worrisome finding that the thrill-seeking centers of the adolescent brain can readily outmatch the teenage brain’s emerging rational control systems. I count myself among the adults who find this neurological account of adolescent recklessness to be both clarifying and confounding. It helpfully explains why really thoughtful teenagers sometimes [...]

Children’s Forgotten ‘Middle Years’, Ages 8-14, Are Crucial To Wellbeing

Early intervention when children are very young – from birth to three years of age, while their brains and skills are developing rapidly – can dramatically improve life prospects. Basics such as good nutrition, language development, and physical, cognitive and social skills can be helped by family and supported by social and early-child development programs. [...]

The Ritual Every Parent Should Do With Their Kids Before The Age Of 7

Pixabay Images   GIVE me the child until the age of seven, and I will give you the man — Jesuit proverb As a new parent, it’s scary to realise that 90 per cent of the brain’s growth happens in the first five years of your child’s life. “Over these crucial years, millions [...]

Can Mental Illness Be Prevented In The Womb?

Flickr Images Every day in the United States, millions of expectant mothers take a prenatal vitamin on the advice of their doctor. The counsel typically comes with physical health in mind: folic acid to help avoid fetal spinal cord problems; iodine to spur healthy brain development; calcium to be bound like molecular Legos [...]

What Babies Know About Physics And Foreign Language

Pixabay Images Parents and policy makers have become obsessed with getting young children to learn more, faster. But the picture of early learning that drives them is exactly the opposite of the one that emerges from developmental science. The trouble is that most people think learning is the sort of thing we do [...]

Seeing The Benefits Of Failure Shapes Kids’ Beliefs About Intelligence

iStockphoto Parents' beliefs about whether failure is a good or a bad thing guide how their children think about their own intelligence, according to new research from Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research indicates that it's parents' responses to failure, and not their beliefs about intelligence, that are [...]