It‘s a hot debate. There are those like Fiona Pattern, the convener of the Australian Sex Party, who says “like sex, porn is a fact of life we should get used to” and then there are the anti porn campaigners like Dr Abigail Bray* who says “Porn is not a right, it is destructive to human dignity”.

Regardless of your point of view regarding porn, there has been a significant shift in the porn world. This has been due to the increased numbers of young people that now have access to porn and the type of porn that is being offered/requested.

Since the advent of the World Wide Web, porn has become more accessible to more people, including young people who are being influenced into thinking that engaging in porn and being in a relationship is the same thing. As such they are expecting their partners to behave like porn stars rather than equal partners that are loved, respected and cherished.

Pornographers themselves are not denying that the future of the industry is increased hard-core sexual violence and there is documented evidence of the escalation in hard-core porn and its new found demand.

So what do they mean by an escalation of hard-core porn?

Well the Marquis de Sade (1740-1814) really got the ball rolling in the 18th century with his penchant for violence and the term sadism was born. This was swiftly followed by Nazi fetish porn, racist porn, torture porn and of course there is bestiality which has been around a long time but has now also been turned into a form of porn.

All these forms of porn have their roots in violence, torture, degradation, domination and abuse. Not exactly qualities we look for in a partner when we are contemplating a relationship.

*Researcher and author, Dr Abigail Bray is co-editor of Big Porn Inc. This book was recently published by Spinifexpress and can be purchased online at Spinifexpress.

Writer Helen Splarn. Editor Dr Ramesh Manocha.
Source: The Sydney Morning Herald