Many alcohol promotions are youth targeted and have a huge impact on forming how accepting young people are of alcohol. But these campaigns contribute towards the damage alcohol consumption has on teenager’s lives.

Magazine ads for alcoholic beverages reached more readers who were 12-20 years of age than adult readers in 2001. 1

According to a 1998 advertising agency study, youths six to 17 years of age identified Budweiser’s cartoon frog ads as their favourite, more popular than any ads for Pepsi, Barbie, Snickers, or Nike. 2

American young people heard more radio advertising for beer and distilled spirits than did people of legal drinking ages in 2001 and 2002. 3

Alcohol is a leading cause of death among youth. 4

Kids only see one public service announcement, usually the alcohol industry’s own responsibility ads, for every 60 alcohol commercials they watch. 5

More than 2/3 of teens and 72% of adults say that alcopops appeal more to underage people than to adults of legal drinking age. 6

Nearly half of all teens in America have tried one of these sweet tasting, colourfully packaged alcoholic beverages. 7

10 magazines with underage audiences of 25% or more accounted for nearly one-third of all alcohol advertising expenditures. 8

In direct violation of the alcohol industry’s own self-regulatory guidelines, Miller and Anheuser-Busch spent $621,991 on television advertisements for Miller Genuine Draft, Miller Lite, Budweiser and Bud Light on shows where the youth audience exceeded 50%. 9

In direct violation of the alcohol industry’s own self-regulatory guidelines, 960 alcohol industry radio ads were placed on programming where the underage audience. 10

References:
1. Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Overexposed: youth a target of alcohol advertising in magazines. September 2002. Craig, F., Garfield, C., Chung, P., and Rathouz, P. Alcohol advertising in magazines and adolescent readership. JAMA; 289:2424-2429, 2003.
2. Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Television: Alcohol’s Vast Adland, December 2002.
3. Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Radio daze: alcohol ads tune in underage youth. April 2003.
4. Ninth Special Report to the U.S. Congress on Alcohol and Health from the Secretary of Health and Human Services. Rockville, MD: USDHHS, Public Health Service, Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Jun 1997. Kann, L., Warren, C., et al., Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 1995. MORB MORTAL WKLY REP CDC SURVEILLANCE SUMMARIES, 45(4):1-84, Sept. 27, 1996.
5. Alcohol Ads: Let’s add a voice of moderation to the mix, SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE, Sept. 15, 2003.
6. New Trends in Advertising and Marketing of Alcoholic Beverages: Hearing Before the Assembly Standing Committee on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, p. 91 (N.Y. Oct. 22, 2002) (statement of Stacia Murphy, Natl. Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Inc.).
7.New Trends in Advertising and Marketing of Alcoholic Beverages: Hearing Before the Assembly Standing Committee on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse p. 4 (N.Y. Oct. 22, 2002) (statement of Assemblyman Sam Hoyt, Chair, Committee on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, New York Assembly).
8. CAMY, Id., p. 1.
9. CAMY, Id., p. 12.
10. CAMY Id. P.5

Writer Helen Splarn. Editor Dr Ramesh Manocha.
Source: Hope networks