An American study of sexting, the practice for teens to send nude or near-nude images of themselves via mobile phones, in 12-17 year olds found that the practice is not as common as widely believed. While the study found that 15% of teens with their own mobile phones have received sexts, only 4% had reported sending the images themselves. The study also found that 19% of teens with a phone had passed on such images.
The results of the study of 800 students are lower then past studies, however past studies did not differentiate between mobile messages and sext-style emails. The study additionally found that older teens are more likely to send sexts, as were teens who paid for all costs associated with their phones.
More information on sexting and its legal implications can be found in this post by Susan McLean.
The full report by Pew Research can be found here.
Writer Tristan Boyd, Editor Dr Ramesh Manocha.

An American study of sexting, the practice for teens to send nude or near-nude images of themselves via mobile phones, in 12-17 year olds found that the practice is not as common as widely believed. While the study found that 15% of teens with their own mobile phones have received sexts, only 4% had reported sending the images themselves.

The results of the study of 800 students are lower then past studies, however past studies did not differentiate between mobile messages and sext-style emails. The study additionally found that older teens are more likely to send sexts, as were teens who paid for all costs associated with their phones.

More information on sexting can be found in this post by Susan McLean.

The full report by Pew Research can be found here.

Writer Tristan Boyd, Editor Dr Ramesh Manocha.